Search

English and Reading

Hang in there!

Tag

Composition

Don’t lose your momentum: Register for 101 in Summer 1!

Why should you register for summer English?

1) Since you’re taking fewer classes, you can focus on your writing without splitting your focus.  2) The instructor has more time since she has fewer classes too.  3) You won’t forget what you learned over the summer, 4) so the fall English class won’t feel like starting over.  5) The lessons and assignments are condensed for the shorter session.  6) You can improve daily.

Don’t lose your momentum.  Register for an English summer course today.  Summer I begins May 30th.

Save yourself the stress:

  • NO balancing your work and class schedule
  • NO fighting traffic multiple times a week
  • NO rushing through class lectures and assignments

Questions? Contact professor Charmaine.Weston@MontgomeryCollege.edu

  • ENGL-101, CRN 43563
  • Intro. to College Writing
  • Summer 1
  • Takoma Park/Silver Spring campus
  • Saturdays, 9-12:45
Featured post

Free Stuff @ENGL-READ Open House

Mobile pockets will be free.
Free “mobile pockets,” lanyards, styluses and other free stuff at the English-Reading Department Open House, Monday Nov. 14, 2 to 4 p.m. Science Center rooms 151 and 152.

Come to the English and Reading Department Open House on Monday 14 November, from 2 – 4 in SC 151 and 152 on the Rockville campus.

The event is a chance for students to see what will be offered next semester, get help with their schedules, decide on General Education information and otherwise get into the swing for spring!

We’ll have games (oh yes we will!), giveaways, advisors to help you make decisions, and laptops ready for your registration! It’s a one-stop shopping extravaganza!

By all means, pop on by.  It will be more fun than you imagine.

A Field Trip through History and Memorials

Here are a few photos from the spring ’16 ENGL 002 unit on memorials and history, which included a visit from DC architect Larysa Kurylas as well as a field trip to downtown DC to visit the Holodomor Famine Memorial, which Kurylas designed, as well as to see the Japanese-American Internment Memorial, the A. Phillip Randolph statue (at Union Station) and the Native American museum on the Mall.

Both activities, lecture and field trip, served as idea gathering as the students went on to develop their own writing, which involved choosing a person in their lives to memorialize.The paper explained the importance of the person as well as the design of the hypothetical monument, and the students memorialized everyone from the inventor of Monopoly, to an unknown parent, to family in Palestine.

–Prof. Joanna Howard

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑