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English and Reading

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Composition

English 102 and Biology 101 Paired Courses: Special Spring’18 ONLY Opportunity

English 102, Critical Reading, Writing and Research is joined with Biology 101, General Biology as paired courses in spring 2018. Team taught by Professors Christina Devlin (English) and Carol Allen (Biology) the course focuses on communication, not just in writing, but through all the means available to living organisms of all kinds.
Special paired course benefits include:

  • Compact Monday-Wednesday schedule for all 7 credits with
    coordinated due dates
  • Germantown campus
  • Readings about critical issues in biology
  • Lab science and transfer composition requirements met

Students in this course pairing will:

  • Acquire critical thinking skills in science and the humanities
  • Practice study skills which apply to any course
  • Discover how lab and library research connect to each other

Students should register for:

 

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Spring’18: Preserve the “Blue Marble”

Preserving the Blue Marble: Environmental Sustainability Through Chemistry and Writing.

Sustainability involves not only how humanity lives in such a way that the resources used exceed those that are available, but also steps we can take to curb or reverse that trend. In this learning community, we will join CHEM 109 and ENGL 103 in order to learn more about local, national, and global sustainability and how to make it part of our daily lives and work.

By enrolling in this learning community, you will work more closely with professors and your fellow students, see the connections between chemistry and technical writing, go on intriguing field trips, and explore how you can make a difference in your own and others’ lives for years to come. You may just find your future career!

Join this learning community:

  • ENGL 103/CHEM 109
  • ENGL fulfills the English Composition requirement
  • T/Th 11-12:15 & 12:30-1:45
  • CRN: 31073
  • For a printable flyer, click here
  • Questions? Contact:
    • Prof. Szlyk at marianne.szlyk@montgomerycollege.edu (ENGL103)
    • Prof. Benson at craig.benson@montgomerycollege.edu (CHEM 109)
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Don’t lose your momentum: Register for 101 in Summer 1!

Why should you register for summer English?

1) Since you’re taking fewer classes, you can focus on your writing without splitting your focus.  2) The instructor has more time since she has fewer classes too.  3) You won’t forget what you learned over the summer, 4) so the fall English class won’t feel like starting over.  5) The lessons and assignments are condensed for the shorter session.  6) You can improve daily.

Don’t lose your momentum.  Register for an English summer course today.  Summer I begins May 30th.

Save yourself the stress:

  • NO balancing your work and class schedule
  • NO fighting traffic multiple times a week
  • NO rushing through class lectures and assignments

Questions? Contact professor Charmaine.Weston@MontgomeryCollege.edu

  • ENGL-101, CRN 43563
  • Intro. to College Writing
  • Summer 1
  • Takoma Park/Silver Spring campus
  • Saturdays, 9-12:45

Free Stuff @ENGL-READ Open House

Mobile pockets will be free.
Free “mobile pockets,” lanyards, styluses and other free stuff at the English-Reading Department Open House, Monday Nov. 14, 2 to 4 p.m. Science Center rooms 151 and 152.

Come to the English and Reading Department Open House on Monday 14 November, from 2 – 4 in SC 151 and 152 on the Rockville campus.

The event is a chance for students to see what will be offered next semester, get help with their schedules, decide on General Education information and otherwise get into the swing for spring!

We’ll have games (oh yes we will!), giveaways, advisors to help you make decisions, and laptops ready for your registration! It’s a one-stop shopping extravaganza!

By all means, pop on by.  It will be more fun than you imagine.

A Field Trip through History and Memorials

Here are a few photos from the spring ’16 ENGL 002 unit on memorials and history, which included a visit from DC architect Larysa Kurylas as well as a field trip to downtown DC to visit the Holodomor Famine Memorial, which Kurylas designed, as well as to see the Japanese-American Internment Memorial, the A. Phillip Randolph statue (at Union Station) and the Native American museum on the Mall.

Both activities, lecture and field trip, served as idea gathering as the students went on to develop their own writing, which involved choosing a person in their lives to memorialize.The paper explained the importance of the person as well as the design of the hypothetical monument, and the students memorialized everyone from the inventor of Monopoly, to an unknown parent, to family in Palestine.

–Prof. Joanna Howard

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