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literature

Artificial Humans 2

Humans have imagined making artificial versions of themselves, from monsters to robots to AI, for thousands of years. Studying written and film examples of these creations helps us understand shared human concerns ranging from the nature of the divine to the desires of the flesh; from the power of the artist to the responsibilities of the parent. Join us as we explore those we make in our own image, out of whatever materials we can find: from clay to flesh to silicon–and beyond.

  • ENGL 235, Film and Literature
  • Spring 2018
  • CRN: 31090
  • Rockville campus.
  • Wed. 1:00 to 3:40 p.m.
  • Prerequisite: ENGL 101/A
  • Questions? Contact Prof. dyon.stefanon@montgomerycollege.edu

Click here for a printable/downloadable flyer.

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Intro to Lit Hybrid This Spring!

This is a fast, convenient way to complete your HUMD requirement. It only meets face-to-face one night a week, with most course discussions on Blackboard. No lengthy research paper required! The textbook is available on Amazon, usually for under $50

  • ENGL 190
  • CRN: 31510
  • Takoma Park/Silver Spring campus
  • LATE STARTING, Thursdays 6:15-8 p.m.
  • HUMD
  • Honors module available, CRN: 36135
  • Prerequisite: students must be at the ENGL 101/A (but it is not a prerequisite).
  • Questions? Contact Prof. joseph.couch@montgomerycollege.edu

Click here for a printable/downloadable flyer.

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Take ENGL 212 Survey of American Literature II

Read and discuss thought-provoking literature from America past and present. Come to your own conclusions about what kind of country we are, have been, and should be.

  • ENGL 212, Survey of American Literature II
  • Spring 2018
  • CRN:  31086
  • Rockville campus.
  • TR 3:30-4:45
  • Prerequisite: ENGL 101/A
  • Questions? Contact Prof. rebecca.eggenschwiler@montgomerycollege.edu

Click here for a printable/downloadable flyer.

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Get Lit! Masterpieces of Asian Literature

After a lengthy absence, Masterpieces of Asian Literature is now being offered. Students will read core texts, including, but not limited to: The Art of War, The Ramayana, and The Tale of Genji.

As this is a “Z” course, all materials will be provided to students electronically. No textbook purchases required!

Students will complete journal entries, engage in spirited (respectful) discussions, and submit a final project on a topic of their choice (related, of course, to an Asian literary text discussed in class.)

The course will be taught using high interest films and audio materials.

Students must have regular access to the internet and have some proficiency in working with cloud documents.

Click here for a printable/downloadable flyer.

  • Masterpieces of Asian Literature
  • ENGL 205
  • Spring 2018
  • CRN: 34389
  • Rockville campus
  • M/W 11 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
  • z-course (zero- or very low-cost textbook materials)
  • Questions? Contact Prof. Courtney.Johnson@montgomerycollege.edu.

Come on, get lit! You won’t regret it!

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Travel Through Time and Space in the World of Short Stories

A study of the short story in world literature with emphasis on the literary form. Students will examine the basic elements of fiction as they appear in short stories. Concentration will be on the literary analysis of short stories from a variety of critical perspectives. (HUMD) PREREQUISITE: A grade of C or better in ENGL 101 or ENGL 101A or consent of department.

This is a z-course: all textbook materials are available at no cost for this section. Regular internet access is required for access to materials. For more information see cms.montgomerycollege.edu/elite/mc-open.

  • ENGL 233
  • Spring 2018
  • CRN: 34572
  • Germantown Campus
  • Mondays 6:30 – 9:10 p.m.
  • HUMD, Humanities Distribution
  • Z-course (free, or very low cost, textbook materials)
  • Prerequisite: ENGL 101/A
  • Questions? Contact Prof. Stephen.Gladson@montgomerycollege.edu
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Spring ’18: Survey of Brit Lit II

Do you want to:

  • Read poetry that is intense, emotional, rebellious, and enigmatic?
  • Experience life through pleasure and pain, tears and laughter, joy and suffering, mysteries and adventures?
  • Understand why race relations are so complex?
  • Find out why our modern existence is so puzzling and confusing?

Learn why in ENGL 214, Survey of British Literature II, literature from the mid-18th to the 20th century.

  • Survey of British Literature II
  • Spring 2018
  • CRN: 33928
  • Distance Learning (online)
  • Honors module is also available under CRN: 36016.
  • HUMD: Humanities Distribution requirements and is transferable to other institutions.
  • You can take Brit Lit II without taking Brit Lit I.
  • For a printable flyer, click here
  • Questions? Contact Prof. Shweta.Sen@montgomerycollege.edu
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Spring’18: Intro. to Literature

Explore the human experience through fiction, poetry, and drama.

Join ENGL 190:

  • Intro. to Literature
  • T/R 12:30 – 1:45 p.m.
  • CRN: 31078
  • Rockville campus

Questions? Contact:

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Spring’18: The U.S. through Literature

Read, discuss, and consider great American authors from 1865 through the present. Through literature, we’ll consider what kind of country America was, is, and should be.

Take ENGL 212:

  • American Literature II
  • CRN: 31086
  • Fulfills HUMD requirement
  • TR, 3:30-4:45
  • Spring 2018
  • Rockville Campus
  • Questions? Contact Prof. Rebecca Eggenschwiler
    • rebecca.eggenschwiler@montgomerycollege.edu
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Spring’18: Women in Literature

“When I say storytelling, I don’t just mean sitting down and telling a once-upon-a-time kind of story. I mean a whole way of seeing yourself, the people around you, your life, the place of life in the bigger context, not just in terms of nature and location, but in terms of what has gone on before and what’s happened to other people.” – Leslie Marmon Silko, Laguna Pueblo

Questions? Contact:

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Spring’18: American Lit & Nature

ENGL 241: American Literature of Nature and the Environment

Throughout the semester, we will explore important questions: How has our connection with nature changed over time, and how have such changes affected us culturally, spiritually, ethically, and nationally? Can we still maintain our connection with nature in a technologically saturated society?

Join:

Questions? Contact:

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Spring’18: Introduction to Literature

Sample some literature this spring. Explore a play by August Wilson; poetry by Gwendolyn Brooks, Sherman Alexie, Li Young Lee, and others; short stories by Ha Jin, Edgar Allan Poe, Joyce Carol Oates, and others; and flash fiction.

Watch an amazing movie. You may even attend a poetry reading!

Questions? Contact:

  • Prof. Marianne Szlyk
    • marianne.szlyk@montgomerycollege.edu
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Women in Lit: Fine Reading, Fulfills Requirements

Germantown, ENGL208, Summer 2

Have fun exploring the work of famous writers such as Mary Shelley, Sojourner Truth, Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, Emily Dickinson, Maya Angelou, Virginia Woolf, Gwendolyn Brooks, Alice Walker, and Amy Tan. This is a great opportunity to read wonderful literature and satisfy a General Education and graduation requirement at the same time!

  • ENGL 208: Women in Literature
  • 3 credit hours
  • 5-week course, July 10- August 10, 2017
  • Monday – Thursday 10:30 a.m. – 12:25 p.m.
  • Germantown campus, PK180
  • Fulfills General Education Humanities Distribution requirement and the Global and Cultural Perspectives requirement for graduation

Questions? Contact professor sharon.anthony@montgomerycollege.edu

Shweta Sen

I won’t try to convince you of the usefulness of literature because its beauty lies in its non-usefulness.  What can you possibly gain from studying the haughtiness of Achilles or the blind stupidity of Oedipus?  What good can come of learning about the promiscuity of Chaucer’s Wife of Bath?  How can the melancholy wistfulness of the ‘Tale of Genji’ be of any use to you?  You can only derive an intense introspective pleasure from reading these works and be struck by the parallels between the worlds of antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance and our modern day existence.  That is all.  If that interests you, please consider signing up for my English 201: World Literature I offered on Rockville campus in Fall 2017.

As for me, what more can I say other than the fact that I am an English professor.  Stacks of essays, cups of coffee, tons of green pens—you get the picture.  Literature is my release, my passion.  My specialization is in British Literature, and my research interests include studies in culture and identity, globalization, and interdisciplinary studies

Prof. Sen teaches:

  • World Literature I, ENGL-201, Fall 2017, CRN 20692
  • Rockville campus

You can reach her:

MC literature poster 2017.
Click here for a full listing of all literature courses at MC.

 

WILLPOWER April 12-20!

MC’s annual WILLPOWER Festival kicked off on April 12 with lectures and performances. It continues through April 20 on all three campuses. Workshops and lectures are free; performances of Twelth Night are $8 for students, $10 for non-students.

For more information concerning WILLPOWER! please visit cms.montgomerycollege.edu/willpower or call 240.567.4001.

For persons requiring special accommodations please visit cms.montgomerycollege.edu or call 240.567.4001

 

David Lemmond

In the Short Story class, we will read – guess what? – short stories. We will read, think about, and talk about interesting stories by Baldwin, Capote, Hemingway, Tan, O’Brien, Walker, Jackson, and others. This course is particularly useful for students in all majors because the focus is on interpretive reading and analysis, two skills used in every major and in most every profession. If you wish to do better in your major field – be it nursing, engineering, or history – this is a fine course to take.

Lemmond has been doing this for a long time. Probably the main thing, maybe the only thing, a prospective student needs to know about Lemmond is that he really, really enjoys teaching this course, but he won’t provide a picture of himself because he doesn’t wish to scare anyone away from taking the course.

Prof. Lemmond is teaching:

  • The Short Story, ENGL233, CRN 20600
  • It’s a late-starting class

You can find him:

Emily Rosado

I am an optimist, lover of animals, and believer in the power of kindness. Current reading obsessions: Stories of explorers Lewis and Clark and the courage of Martin Luther.

Why should you take Introduction to Literature? To read the innermost thoughts of others allows us a window into our own fears, hopes, desires, and dreams. Journey with me through stories of bravery, heartache, loneliness, and conflict. To study literature is to study human nature and learn more about ourselves.

Prof. Rosado teaches:

  • Intro. to Literature, ENGL 190, CRN 20320
  • Distance Learning, late start

You can reach her:

Drama Whirlwind Tour Spring 2017

Take Introduction to Modern Drama, Spring 2017!

In the redesigned course, we explore plays and theatre productions as a way to understand humanity. Every week, we’ll take on a different play, making for a fun whirlwind tour of some of the most exciting moments in theatre history.

We’ll also talk about politics and social movements from the Civil Rights Movement to Broadway riots, asking what difference theatre can make in our world. No previous experience in theatre or studying literature is necessary.

Prerequisite: C or better in ENGL 101 or 101A.

Questions? Contact: Dr. Anne Pulju: anne.pulju@montgomerycollege.edu.

  • ENGL230 Intro. to Modern Drama
  • Wednesdays Germantown campus, 6:30p.m.
  • CRN35368
  • Fulfills General Education Humanities requirements.

Spring 2017: Cosmos, Heroes and Monsters! Take Intro. to World Lit. 1

Learn about creation and cosmos, epic heroes and monsters, kings and queens, self and society.  It’s quite an adventure!!

Sign up:

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